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Posts for: July, 2017

By Inland Oral Surgery
July 27, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Cleft Lip  

Discover the best way to correct a cleft lip and to improve your appearance.cleft lip

The day your child is born is one of the most exciting moments in a parent’s life. Of course, finding out your precious newborn has a cleft lip can make things a little more complicated. Luckily, our expert oral and maxillofacial surgeons Dr. David Gailey in Spokane, WA, are here to help you determine the best way to treat your child’s cleft lip to put your mind at ease.

Why should a cleft lip be treated?

A cleft lip can present many challenges if left untreated including hearing or speech problems. As you can imagine, a cleft lip can affect a child’s speech. Children born with cleft lips are also more likely to develop ear infections. By repairing this birth defect as soon as possible we can minimize these issues.

Most children will undergo a cleft lip repair before their first birthday. Consequent surgeries may be required later on, depending on a variety of factors including the severity of the defect.

How is a cleft lip treated?

Surgery is the only way to correct a cleft lip. The goal of this surgery is to not only improve your child’s appearance but also make it easier for them to speak, chew or hear. This surgery is performed under general anesthesia, so your child will be asleep throughout the procedure. To repair the cleft lip, our Spokane, WA, oral and maxillofacial surgeons will make incisions on both sides of the defect and then stitch these two pieces of tissue together to close the gap, which will greatly improve the shape and appearance of your child’s lip.

A cleft palate repair may also be necessary to improve the roof of the mouth, which can improve speech. When your child comes in for a consultation we will be able to determine whether or not they will also require this restorative procedure.

If your child was born with a cleft lip and you want to talk to us about their treatment options then call Inland Oral Surgery in Spokane, WA, today to schedule your child’s consultation. We are here to provide you and your little one with the best care possible.


By Inland Oral Surgery
July 18, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
JohnnysTeethArentRottenAnyMore

Everyone has to face the music at some time — even John Lydon, former lead singer of The Sex Pistols, arguably England’s best known punk rock band. The 59-year old musician was once better known by his stage name, Johnny Rotten — a brash reference to the visibly degraded state of his teeth. But in the decades since his band broke up, Lydon’s lifelong deficiency in dental hygiene had begun to cause him serious problems.

In recent years, Lydon has had several dental surgeries — including one to resolve two serious abscesses in his mouth, which left him with stitches in his gums and a temporary speech impediment. Photos show that he also had missing teeth, which, sources say, he opted to replace with dental implants.

For Lydon (and many others in the same situation) that’s likely to be an excellent choice. Dental implants are the gold standard for tooth replacement today, for some very good reasons. The most natural-looking of all tooth replacements, implants also have a higher success rate than any other method: over 95 percent. They can be used to replace one tooth, several teeth, or an entire arch (top or bottom row) of teeth. And with only routine care, they can last for the rest of your life.

Like natural teeth, dental implants get support from the bone in your jaw. The implant itself — a screw-like titanium post — is inserted into the jaw in a minor surgical operation. The lifelike, visible part of the tooth — the crown — is attached to the implant by a sturdy connector called an abutment. In time, the titanium metal of the implant actually becomes fused with the living bone tissue. This not only provides a solid anchorage for the prosthetic, but it also prevents bone loss at the site of the missing tooth — which is something neither bridgework nor dentures can do.

It’s true that implants may have a higher initial cost than other tooth replacement methods; in the long run, however, they may prove more economical. Over time, the cost of repeated dental treatments and periodic replacement of shorter-lived tooth restorations (not to mention lost time and discomfort) can easily exceed the expense of implants.

That’s a lesson John Lydon has learned. “A lot of ill health came from neglecting my teeth,” he told a newspaper reporter. “I felt sick all the time, and I decided to do something about it… I’ve had all kinds of abscesses, jaw surgery. It costs money and is very painful. So Johnny says: ‘Get your brush!’”

We couldn’t agree more. But if brushing isn’t enough, it may be time to consider dental implants. If you would like more information about dental implants, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implants” and “Save a Tooth or Get an Implant?


By Inland Oral Surgery
July 03, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: canker sore  
YouDonthavetoSufferfromIrritatingCankerSores

We've all had them — tiny sores that pop up seemingly out of nowhere under the tongue or the inside of the cheek. They're named aphthous ulcers, but are more commonly known as canker sores. For some people, they can be a recurring irritation.

Round with a yellow-gray center surrounded by reddened skin, aphthous ulcers seem to coincide with periods of anxiety or stress, or as a result of some minor trauma. Many people will feel a tingling or painful sensation a few hours or days before the ulcers appear. Once they appear they usually persist for a week to ten days before finally drying and healing. In the meantime they can be painful, especially while eating or drinking.

One form known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) affects about a quarter of the population with outbreaks of multiple ulcers that occur regularly. RAS ulcers are usually one centimeter or more in size — the larger the sore the more painful they tend to be.

There are ways to ease the discomfort of an ulcer outbreak and help hasten their healing. A number of over-the-counter products can be used in minor cases to numb the area temporarily and cover it to facilitate healing. We can also apply steroids or inject other medications for more severe cases. You may also find curbing your eating of certain foods like tomato sauce, citrus or spicy dishes can help.

For the most part aphthous ulcers aren't dangerous. In some situations, though, you should seek dental or medical evaluation: a sore that doesn't heal within two weeks; increases in severity, frequency or duration of ulcers; or when you don't seem to ever be without an ulcer in your mouth. We may need to perform tests, including tissue biopsy, to make sure there aren't any underlying systemic conditions causing the ulcers.

More than likely, though, you'll only need relief from the aggravation caused by aphthous ulcers. Among the many remedies, there's one right for you.

If you would like more information on aphthous ulcers or other mouth sores, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Mouth Sores.”