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Posts for: May, 2018

By Inland Oral Surgery
May 25, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   diabetes  
DentalImplantsandDiabetes

Today, dental implants are an increasingly popular option for replacing lost teeth — an issue faced by many older Americans. It’s not hard to see why these high-tech prosthetic teeth are preferred: They look, “feel” and function just like natural teeth… and with proper care they can last the rest of your life. Unfortunately, many people who could benefit from implants also face an additional health problem: diabetes, a metabolic disease that can affect many different parts of the body, sometimes severely.  Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to nerve and tissue damage, and may adversely impact your oral health. So if you have diabetes, does it mean you won’t be able to get dental implants? 

The short answer is no — but there are some considerations that diabetics (and their health care providers) need to keep in mind. For example, it has been demonstrated that wounds in diabetics tend to heal more slowly, and are more prone to infection than those in non-diabetics. Also, people with diabetes sometimes experience a chronic inflammatory response, which can eventually lead to tissue damage or other problems.

Because the placement of dental implants requires minor surgery, dentists and researchers have questioned whether people with diabetes are good candidates for implants. Now there’s encouraging news: Several recent studies have come to the conclusion that many diabetics can indeed undergo an implant procedure without undue risk.

One key consideration is how well an individual can control his or her blood glucose levels. Researchers have found that diabetics with good blood glucose control, those with poor glucose control, and non-diabetics all have similar implant success rates (above 95%). However, in diabetics with poor glucose control, more time may be needed for the jawbone to heal in the area where the implant procedure was done. That doesn’t by any means rule out the placement of a dental implant — but it does mean that special considerations apply to individuals in this situation.

So if you are considering an implant procedure but have trouble controlling your blood glucose levels, ask us how we can help. Just remember that in most cases, having diabetes doesn’t mean you won’t be able to enjoy the benefits of dental implants. If you have additional questions, contact us or schedule an appointment.


By Inland Oral Surgery
May 15, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
CrownscannowbemadeIn-OfficewiththeCADCAMSystem

The traditional way to restore a tooth with an artificial crown takes several weeks and multiple office visits: from tooth preparation and impression molding to crown production by a dental laboratory, followed by adjustments and cementing. Now, there’s an alternative that reduces this process to a fraction of the time, and all from your dentist’s office.

Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) is a digital system that enables dentists to create dental restorations with laboratory-grade materials in minutes rather than weeks. As it continues to innovate, you’ll see more and more dentists investing in the new technology for their patients.

A crown restoration with CAD/CAM begins like any other with decay removal and preparation of the tooth. It diverges, though, from the traditional in how an impression of your teeth and gums is obtained: instead of rubber-like molding materials to create a physical impression, we lightly dust the mouth interior with a reflective powder. Using a scanning wand, the reflective powder allows us to capture multiple, detailed images of your mouth that the CAD/CAM computer transforms into an accurate three-dimensional model.

We use the model to first assess if the tooth has been effectively prepared for a restoration. If so, the design feature of the system will provide us with thousands of tooth forms to choose from to match with your natural teeth. You’ll be able to view the proposed size and shape of the new crown via computer simulation before signing off on the design.

Next is the actual manufacture of the crown that takes place right in the dentist’s office. A pre-formed block of ceramic material is inserted in the milling equipment where, following the pre-determined computer design, the milling heads carve the ceramic block. After milling, we fine-tune the crown surface and apply stains or glazes fired to create a life-like color and texture that matches your natural teeth. We can then adjust the crown in your mouth and permanently affix it to the tooth.

While much of the CAD/CAM system is automated, ultimate success still depends on the dentist’s expertise and artistry. CAD/CAM enhances those skills with greater precision and in much less time than traditional crowns. It’s certainly a growing option for many people to restore the form and function of decayed teeth.

If you would like more information on computer-aided dental restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Creating In-Office Dental Restorations with Computers.”


By Inland Oral Surgery
May 05, 2018
Category: Oral Health
KeepanEyeontheJawBoneAfteraTeenagersToothLoss

Accidents happen, especially to teenagers involved with sports or similar activities. In an instant they can lose one or more teeth and permanently alter their smile.

Fortunately we can restore a teenager’s lost teeth, but often not immediately as a permanent restoration with a dental implant requires maturity of their jaw structure. Our focus then turns to the age of the patient and the condition of the underlying bone. A future dental implant, your best choice for tooth replacement, depends on bone for support, but also the age of the patient as it relates to jaw development.

There are a couple of ways an accidental tooth loss can harm supporting bone: first and foremost, the impact of the accident itself can damage the bony socket. To find out for sure we may need to perform a cone beam scan, a type of x-ray that allows us to view the area three-dimensionally. If we do find damage, we can attempt to repair the socket through bone grafting.

Bone can also suffer from the long-term absence of a tooth. Bone has a growth cycle in which older cells dissolve and new ones form to take their place. The force generated by teeth when we eat or chew helps stimulate this growth. Without stimulation, as with a missing tooth, the bone may not grow at a healthy rate. In time, it could lose some of its volume and density and not be able to support an implant.

Installing an implant right after tooth loss could help avoid this situation. Bone has a natural affinity with the titanium post imbedded in the jaw and will naturally grow and adhere to it. But we can’t place an implant with a teenager. This is because the jaw is still developing so an implant would gradually become misaligned as the jaw grows. It’s best to install an implant later after full jaw development in early adulthood.

Today, we can place a bone graft in the empty socket right after tooth loss. The graft serves as a scaffold for bone cells to grow on and will help keep the bone volume at a healthy level until we can install an implant.

Timing is everything in restoring a teenager’s accidental tooth loss. But with coordination and care for the supporting bone, a teenager can eventually enter their adult years with their smile intact.

If you would like more information on restoring your teenager’s smile after tooth loss, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants for Teenagers.”